Americans are increasingly in favour of legalizing some form of marijuana — especially medical — and a majority across the board think the federal government should leave legal states alone.

A new Quinnipiac poll released Thursday found 71 percent of Americans would oppose a federal crackdown on legal marijuana, and 93 percent are in favour of medical marijuana, according to the survey of 1,323 voters nationwide.

It appears that this is the first time the enforcement action question was posed as part of the Quinnipiac polls, which in the past have surveyed Americans about their support or opposition of issues such as marijuana use, legalization and decriminalization.

Questions abound about potential enforcement of federal marijuana law following the election of Donald Trump as president and the subsequent appointment of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, as the nation’s attorney general.

When broken out by political affiliation, gender, education, race and age, the majority of the respective groups surveyed opposed such an action, according to the poll. The survey was conducted Feb. 16-21 via landline and cellphone interviews, with a margin of error of plus or minus 2.7 percentage points.

Public support for marijuana legalization has grown since the November election, in which a historic number of states approved medical or recreational legalization measures. A June 2016 Quinnipiac poll showed that 54 percent of adults surveyed favoured the legalization of marijuana use in the United States and 89 percent supported allowing adults to legally use medical marijuana if their doctor prescribes it.

Flash-forward to now: 59 percent of adults surveyed favoured the legalization of marijuana use in the United States, and 93 percent supported allowing adults to legally use medical marijuana if their doctor prescribes it, according to Thursday’s poll.

Original article via TheCannabist